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5 Wine Resolutions for 2018

New year, new you, right? Hit up the gym more. Cut some carbs. It’s the same story every year, and usually results in utter frustration and disappointment. Forego this year’s resolution (if you haven’t already broken it), and instead add something fun and new to your life, rather than take away.
Whether you’re a novice or an aficionado, make it a point this year to branch out and try something when it comes to wine. Maybe you start trying different varietals that you haven’t before, or decide you’re going to learn more about that Italian region from which you’ve been loving Nebbiolo. Heck, maybe you’re going to explore making wine yourself. As grandiose or simple as it is, make 2018 a year where you’re going to enrich your wine repertoire. After all, drinking wine is a pretty easy resolution to keep.

Here’s five achievable goals that I suggest you give a go in the new year. Who knows, you may find out 2018 really is the year for a new you!

1. Explore Tokay

Tokay, or Tokaji (coming from the Tokaj region of Hungary or neighboring Slovakia), is a sweet wine that’s been getting a bit of buzz lately. Hungarian wine? Odd, perhaps, but it’s been around for centuries, and is only now getting the attention is deserves on a global scale. Tokay is made under using noble rot, a process in which a particular fungus punctures the grapes, allowing them to release moisture and concentrate their juices (hence the increased sugar content for a sweet wine). Tokay is cropping up on more and more wine lists – if you come across it, it’s well worth exploring.

2. Host a monthly wine tasting

This can be as complicated or as simple as you like (and you can get some tips on how to get started here), but wine tastings via comparison are the very best way to learn more about wine and further explore new varietals and regions. Get a small group of friends to commit to doing a causal wine tasting every few weeks (this shouldn’t be very hard), and rotate who hosts. The more you try, the more you learn, and the more you’ll discover what speaks to your palate. Tip: don’t forget snacks.

Make this a year of wine tastings – it’s a great way to learn about wine, not to mention a good excuse to throw a party 

3. Put you reds in the fridge

We’ve already explained why temperature matters when you serve wine, and how some reds do better with a bit of a chill, but I want to stress in particular what wonders a bit of time in the fridge can do for wines like Gamay and Pinot Noir. I’m stocking up on these light, drinkable varietals and keeping them on deck (or, well, in the fridge) for the coming hot months.

4. Go to more cellar doors

We’re spoiled for choice when it comes to wineries in Australia, particularly here in Melbourne where within an hour’s drive, there are dozens of wonderful vineyards to visit and winemakers to meet. A fun day trip to escape the city plus the added bonus of supporting winemakers by buying directly? This one’s a win-win.

5. Start a wine cellar

Perhaps more appropriate for some than others, but this doesn’t have to be a literal cellar. Moreover, this doesn’t have to be an expensive endeavour.  I’ve recently just started thinking about this, and have committed to building – slowly (very slowly), but surely – a collection. Make it as simple as keeping one nice bottle aside every month or two, rather than smashing through your supplies as soon as you’re home form the bottle shop. Big or small, a special collection of wines will always be a nice thing to have for future occasions, so you might as well start storing now!

Learn more about stocking that cellar by reading the questions you should ask at the bottle shop.

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Jill Haapaniemi

Jill Haapaniemi

Jill is a lover of all things food and wine. As a food blogger and recipe developer, she is passionate about sharing meals with others, never without a bottle of something to enhance the experience. She spends her free time at her partner’s family winery just outside of Melbourne, and can usually be found drinking Oregon Pinot, wines from the Rhône Valley or Victorian Shiraz.
Jill Haapaniemi

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